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WORKSHOP #2 MAY 30 7:30 AM - 12 pm

Methods and Uncertainty of Rapid Geomorphic Assessments (RGAs)

INSTRUCTORs: Jason R. Vogel, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, University of Oklahoma and Kari Bigham, P.E., Research Assistant, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Kansas State University

Materials that students need to bring: waders if desired (participants will go in a stream)

Materials student will receive:  handouts

Learning Objectives:

The learning objectives are as follows:

a)      Develop an understanding of the methodology for RGAs and improve their RGA application skills, including the bank erosion hazard index (BEHI) and others.

b)     Using the BEHI as an example, understand factors associated with the sensitivity and variability of the parameters utilized to assess bank erosion potential.

c)      Have a better understanding proper method selection and limitations associated with RGAs

At the completion of this workshop students will be able to:

1.  Properly apply RGAs in the field to assess stream erosion potential.

2. Develop an understanding of the factors associated with the sensitivity and variability of the parameters utilized to assess stream bank erosion potential.

Workshop Description:

Excess sediment is a leading cause of stream impairment in the United States, resulting in poor water quality, sedimentation of downstream waterbodies, and damage to aquatic ecosystems. Rapid geomorphic assessments (RGAs) are one method to index the bank erosion potential of streams. However, misunderstandings regarding purpose, proper technique, variability and sensitivity of these methods are often used as arguments against their use. In this workshop, attendees will learn the methods involved with RGAs, including the bank erosion hazard index (BEHI) and others. Other types of RGAs, including near bank stress (NBS) and others will also be introduced. Recent research will be discussed regarding the uncertainty of BEHI measurements.  Finally, the attendees will have the opportunity to characterize one nearby stream site using these methods.  Following the workshop, participant assessments and associated information will be collected and later distributed to demonstrate variability of the results and correlation to associated practitioner characteristics.